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Our materials: Hemp

Hemp fiber is very strong, and it will keep a good appearance for a long time. As a fabric, hemp provides all the warmth and softness of a natural textile but with superior durability that is seldomly found in other materials. The process of growing hemp fibres does not need irrigation or pesticides since hemp is a very strong and fast growing fibre. Hemp is extremely versatile and can be used for countless products such as apparel, accessories, shoes, furniture, car and home furnishings. Apparel made from hemp incorporates all its beneficial qualities and will likely last longer and withstand harsh conditions.

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Our Materials: Linen

Linen is known for being the oldest natural fibre still in use today made from the stalks of the flax plant Linum. Linen is highly breathable, soft and a natural insulator. It's fibres are hollow, moving air and moisture naturally. It is valued for its ability to keep cool in the summer months and trap warmth in colder weather. This is all achieved through the natural properties of the fibre itself. The production of linen requires less water and fares better in terms of water toxicity. As a result, overall, the environmental impact of the linen (flax) garment is considered to be much lower than that of the cotton garment.

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Our Materials: Surplus Fabrics

Being a sustainable brand means to encourage a more mindful fashion sense. Fabrics that are left over from textile factories are called SURPLUS TEXTILES or dead stock. These are eventually recycled or thrown away. Giving SURPLUS fabrics a new purpose is a good way of giving value to what already exists, offering more without damaging the environment.  Elementum uses fabric SURPLUSES from Portuguese factories only, and exclusively from natural fibers.

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Our Materials: Cupro

Technically, it’s cotton, but from another part of the cotton plant, giving the resulting fabric a significantly different feel than typical cotton. The fiber itself is derived from cotton linter, which is the very fine, soft material that sticks to the cottonseeds and is left behind after the cotton has been ginned. Usually, these fibers are discarded, however, they are now recycled for the production of this surprisingly beautiful textile.

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